Archive for September, 2009

Climate Change Causing More Earthquakes, Tsunamis

September 30th, 2009

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The tsunami and earthquakes that ravaged islands in the Pacific may be just the beginning of an increase in geological disasters due to climate change.

Earthbeat host Mike Tidwell discusses the link with Alan Linde, a geophysicist with the Carnegie Institution of Washington. Bill McGuire, a professor of geophysics and climate at the University College London, who recently organized the first ever conference on the connections between climate change and geological hazards. McGuire is the author of the book, Seven Years to Save the Planet.

The small island nations nations of the world and islands like American Samoa are fighting to keep their heads literally above water with a discussion with Carroll Muffett of the Climate Law and Policy Project.

The worldwide economic downturn has an unexpected silver lining – our carbon emissions dipped as our bank accounts plummeted. Host Mike Tidwell talks dollars and sense with Peter Brown, a professor at McGill University and the co-author of the book Right Relationship.

Image – one of the chain of coral atolls that make up the Maldives islands

Music includes Maldives Night by Max Madisson and Nonu a Togi and Sasa by the Samoan Music Ensemble.

Our theme music is Baladi by Tony Anka, Bellydance Superstars vol. 2.

If you’d like to hear this edition of Earthbeat – please send us an e-mail

China & India Leaving the U.S. Behind

September 22nd, 2009

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Advancements in China and India on greenhouse gas emission targets and leaps forward on renewable energy resources in China and India may be leaving the United States behind.

Earthbeat host Daphne Wysham discusses how the rest of the world is leaping forward on a clean energy future with Lester Brown. Lester is the president of the Earth Policy Institute and the author of a recent editorial in the Washington Post and the forthcoming book, Plan B 4.0 Mobilizing to Save Civilization.

David Bookbinder, the chief climate counsel of the Sierra Club and Tyson Slocum, the head of Public Citizen’s energy program discuss the pending U.S. action in the Senate on the nation’s first major legislation to fight climate change.

Image used courtesy of Laura Padgett via Flickr.

Music by Jacco Muller – Viento del Desierto. Our theme music is Baladi by Tony Anka, Bellydance Superstars vol. 2.

If you’d like to hear this edition of Earthbeat – please send us an e-mail

Walrus Stampede

September 15th, 2009

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Bestselling author and investigative journalist Greg Palast joins host Daphne Wysham to discuss how the oil company Chevron is behind the firing of hurricane experts at Louisiana State University. The case of fired Louisiana State University professor, Ivor van Heerden is in the movie Big Easy to Big Empty.

Melting sea ice is pushing Pacific walruses onto land and resulting in unusual, massive herds of the animals. On the same week that the federal government agreed to review putting the walrus on the endangered species list – a herd in Alaska stampeded killing hundreds of the animals. Joining us discuss how oil and gas drilling is affecting the walruses is biologist Shaye Wolf of the Climate Law Institute at the Center for Biological Diversity.

The plan to create carbon offsets in the current U.S. climate bill could result in offsetting any true action on climate change. Michael Despines, the Friends of the Earth Climate Resilience Campaign Coordinator, discusses what’s coming us next in the U.S. Senate in this week’s edition of our ongoing series, the Countdown to Copenhagen.

Image copyright The Center for Biological Diversity – Bill Hickey.

Our theme music is Baladi by Tony Anka, Bellydance Superstars vol. 2.

If you’d like to hear this edition of Earthbeat – please send us an e-mail

The Promise of Biochar

September 8th, 2009

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Biochar is a type of charcoal that’s the result of burning plant matter with very low oxygen. It’s a sooty, black substance that holds great promise for not only slowing down climate change, but actually reversing it. Host Mike Tidwell discusses the promise of biochar with Durwood Zaelke, the president and founder of the Institute for Governance and Sustainable Development.

Then we discuss the nuts and bolts of the upcoming UN climate talks in Copenhagen. Ideally, nearly 200 countries will come together and leave the meeting with a 50-page treaty that’ll be a framework for the world to plan for worldwide climate change. Joining us to discuss how far away the world is from that goal is Angela Ledford Anderson, a program director for US Climate Action Network.

What’s likely the nation’s largest residential solar project is right here in the nation’s capital. Anya Schoolmaker joins us; she’s the president of the Mt. Pleasant Solar Coop.

Music used in this edition of Earthbeat is ‘Charcoal’ by Mrs. Tanaka.

Our theme music is Baladi by Tony Anka, Bellydance Superstars vol. 2.

If you’d like to hear this edition of Earthbeat – please send us an e-mail

Pond Scum Turning Raw Sewage into Biofuel

September 1st, 2009

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Four years after the disaster of Hurricane Katrina, we review how the city of New Orleans is – or isn’t – prepared for future storms and the other devastating effects of climate change.

Joining host Mike Tidwell from Baton Rouge is Mark Davis, the director of the Tulane Institute on Water Resources Law and Policy at Tulane Law School; and discussing how the record warm ocean waters feed into stronger storms is Joe Romm, the author of the website Climate Progress.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is suing the EPA to undermine the science of climate change. Jim Tankersley reported on the suit, and the other tactics the Chamber is using to undermine action on climate change for the LA Times and the Chicago Tribune.

Then we speak to Greg Breining about how the city of Minneapolis is using natural algae to turn metropolitan wastewater into biofuels to power city buses.


Our theme music is Baladi by Tony Anka, Bellydance Superstars vol. 2.

If you’d like to hear this edition of Earthbeat – please send us an e-mail